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7 Astros among MLB.com' midseason prospect rankings

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The Astros dominate the Top 100, with seven players featuring.

Thomas B. Shea-USA TODAY Sports

MLB's prospect team of Jonathan Mayo and Jim Callis released their midseason rankings for MLBPipeline's Top 100 Prospect List, as well as updated versions of each team's top 30 prospects. Alex Bregman, who dominated the minor leagues this season, -- earning himself a spot on the major league roster, just one year after having been drafted -- jumped all the way to the number one overall spot, beating out Yoan Moncada, J.P. Crawford, and Lucas Giolito.

Bregman slashed .333/.373/.641 in Triple-A, prior to his call up. His absolutely absurd season is no doubt worthy of not just his major league promotion, but also the top spot on the Top 100 Prospect List, rising 21 spots from the rankings at the start of the season. The Astros have the most representatives on the list, with seven of their minor leaguers featuring on the list. The following players made the cut:

  • Alex Bregman (#1)
  • A.J. Reed (#38)
  • Francis Martes (#41)
  • Kyle Tucker (#63)
  • Forrest Whitley (#85)
  • David Paulino (#86)
  • Joe Musgrove (#87)
The Los Angeles Angels, and the Baltimore Orioles were the only teams not to feature a single player.

Of course, The Top 100 Prospect List is not the only thing to pay attention to. Re-rankings of each team's top 30 prospects has also taken place. The Astros can be seen here. Derek Fisher, Daz Cameron, and Albert Abreu follow the seven prospects who feature in the Top 100 to make up the Astros top ten.

Of course, however, we must remember that Top 100 Lists are not exhaustive lists of talented prospects. Lance McCullers reminded us of that, a man who is now an ace in the major leagues, who never made it on the list.

Another interesting tidbit, Callis indicated on Twitter that new signing Yulieski Gourriel would've been number the number two prospect for the Astros, and would have fallen in either the late teens, or early twenties on the overall Top 100 Prospect List. Which is crazy, given that he is 32 years old. The Astros may be in win-now mode, but they still posses one of the best farm systems in the game.

The future is bright for the Astros.